Tag Archives: Screenprint

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Katherine Baca-Bielinis: Printmaker

Katherine’s artwork is on view in our juried exhibition “Small Works 2016”. Her work is available for purchase in our Online Gallery Shop:
store.mainstreetartsgallery.com


I am often asked how a native of San Francisco ended up in Rochester, NY.  I reply, “It was fate!”  After earning a BA in Studio Art with a concentration in Printmaking from California State University at Long Beach, fate took me on a slow eastward journey across the country that eventually ended in Rochester – my home for the past 30 years.  Fate also steered me to R.I.T. where I received a Masters in Art Education. This resulted in a long, wonderful career teaching art in Rochester area schools.

After retiring, fate intervened once again.  It allowed me to finally focus my energies on my professional art career and led me back to printmaking – my true artistic passion.  I have directed my initial efforts towards learning non-toxic processes that afford me the ability to work in my home studio, as well as the Printmaking studio at R.I.T.  All forms of printmaking fascinate me.  My current efforts are primarily focused however on lithography and etching with an occasional departure to silkscreen. These methods enable me to draw, which is an essential part of my work.

My home studio.

My home studio.

My current imagery stems from a love of old world architecture and a desire to present the grandeur of the urban environment. In our hectic lives, full of distractions, it is often difficult to take a moment to enjoy the beauty around us. In my work, I hope to reconnect the viewer with the elegance and craftsmanship of these architectural features that were missed along the way.

My process usually begins with a photograph that I have taken – in this case,  “Casa Batllo”  in Barcelona at Antoni Gaudi’s architectural masterpiece.

Photo, Casa Batllo, Barcelona.

Photo, Casa Batllo, Barcelona.

A drawing is then developed from the photo.

Drawing for silkscreen "Casa Batllo", based on a photo  taken in Barcelona.

Drawing for silkscreen “Casa Batllo”

Silkscreen is a shape-based method, so the next step is to develop the color separations on tracing paper or vellum, always keeping in mind that overlapping colors will create additional colors.

Color separations on vellum.

Color separations on vellum.

Each separation is then transferred to a silkscreen using photo emulsion and a light exposure unit.  I use ink dispersions in a transparent base medium which allows for a subtle build up of colors, almost giving the appearance of watercolor.

Silkscreen with image transferred to emulsion.  This is now ready to print.

Silkscreen with image transferred to emulsion. This is now ready to print.

Each color builds upon the last until all colors have been printed. Below is the completed  silkscreen, currently on view at Main Street Arts Gallery, Small Works Exhibition.

Completed silkscreen, "Casa Batllo".

Completed silkscreen, “Casa Batllo”.

Additional works can currently be seen at the Mill Art Center and Gallery, ROCO and the Ink Shop.


Stop by Main Street Arts to see Katherine’s work in our current exhibition “Small Works 2016” (juried by Bleu Cease, Executive Director/Curator of RoCo; exhibition runs through January 6th). Katherine’s work is available in our Online Gallery Shop: store.mainstreetartsgallery.com. Visit her website at www.kcbaca.com.

Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by artist Richard Harvey.

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Ellie Honl: Part I

_MG_7924My name is Ellie Honl and I am currently an art professor at Indiana University in Bloomington, IN. I am originally from Stevens Point, a city of about 35,000 in Central Wisconsin. My mother is an art teacher so I was very fortunate to have early exposure to the arts. I had an endless supply of art materials, and my mom took my younger brother and I to a lot of art museums growing up. We lived in an area where there weren’t many other children, so my brother and I spent a lot of time entertaining ourselves by building forts in the forest behind our house, Lego cities, and elaborate canal systems in our sandbox. I also taught myself things like calligraphy and needlepoint. This history of exploration and independence contributes to my art making today.

 

I thought about being an artist as a child, but in high school I loved math and science, and planned to become a psychiatrist or architect. It wasn’t until my junior year at St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota that I finally decided to pursue studio art. Even though I liked a lot of different subjects, art was the one that fulfilled me the most and satisfied my need to create. The subject of psychology and architectural elements play a major role in my artwork today.

I pursued printmaking at the University of Iowa and received my MFA in 2008. Since then, I have taught art at a number of Universities and art centers across the country while continuing to make my own artwork.

This is me screenprinting in the printshop at Indiana University.

This is me screenprinting in the classroom at Indiana University.

My artwork utilizes printmaking techniques along with photographic and time-based media. I’ve currently been making screenprints and cyanotypes that I incorporate together by sewing, and I often paint and add other collaged elements to them. I also make stop-motion animations with these prints and/or parts of these prints.

"Assemble," cyanotype, screenprint, sewing, collage, 2013

“Assemble,” cyanotype, screenprint, sewing, collage, 2013

"Take Root" (detail), cyanotype, screenprint, sewing, 2013

“Take Root” (detail), cyanotype, screenprint, sewing, 2013

I am inspired by the wonders I observe around me (often in nature) but the outcome of my artwork is usually about the human condition: how we cope, how we perceive, and how we are affected by our past. It is about the human desire to find stability. Through my artwork, I try to understand why things are the way they are and strive to find logic in the random. I work intuitively allowing myself to experiment with unpredictable processes to discover new marks and imagery. Many times these initial investigations look chaotic and they provide a problem for me to resolve. I impose order through geometric forms and color, while making connections through lines, written explanations, and collage elements. My work is often detailed and visually appealing, and I hope that it draws people in and causes them to enjoy the process of looking.

"Becoming," cyanotype, gouache, colored pencil,   2014

“Becoming,” cyanotype, gouache, colored pencil, 24″x30″ 2014

"Westminster Ct.: Appearances Can be Deceiving," silkscreen and colored pencil on layers of frosted mylar, 20"x30" 2014

“Westminster Ct.: Appearances Can be Deceiving,” silkscreen and colored pencil on layers of frosted mylar, 20″x30″ 2014

Check back later in the week to read about Ellie’s creative process in Inside the Artist’s Studio with Ellie Honl: Part II.

You can see more of Ellie’s artwork on her website at www.elliehonl.com. Stop by to see three of her pieces (including one honorable mention!) in our current juried exhibition, Structurally Speaking.

Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by architectural painter Susan Stuart.