Tag Archives: Printmaking

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Gregory Page: Motifs From My Back Yard

The following images show my printmaking process.  The photos are from a project completed while I was on sabbatical leave in 2013. Three print were produced and several unique impressions at Normal Editions Workshop at Illinois State University in the College of Fine Arts School of Art, Normal, Illinois.

I worked with Professor Richard Finch (Director of Normal Editions), Veda Rives (Associate Director), and Christopher Hagen and Alyssa Tauber (both graduate students in the Department of Art).  I also worked with Jessica Chambers (Director of the Horticulture Center at Illinois State University) and Professor Don Schmidt (Dean of the School of Biological Sciences and Director of the Biological Sciences Greenhouse Collection at the Felmley Annex). I also visited the Rapp Agricultural Building Greenhouse.

Collecting the plants:

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Drying the plants:

Drying the plants

Soaking the leaves:

Soaking the leaves

Leaves in the tray coated with tusche:

Leaves in the tray coated with tusche

Leaves are placed on Artex film:

Leaves placed on Artex Film

Leaves dry and are removed from the film:

Leaves dry and removed from film

The exposed plate:

Exposed Plate

Printing:

Printing

The plate is printed:

The Plate is printed

The prints are signed:

The Prints are signed.

The finished prints:

Motif From ISU Greenhouse Selections I

Motif From ISU Greenhouse Selections I

Motifs From Greenhouse Selections II

Motifs From Greenhouse Selections II

Motifs From Greenhouse Selections I & II

Motifs From Greenhouse Selections I & II

Prints in the Upstate New York Printmaking Invitational at Main Street Arts:

Gregory Page

Gregory Page


Stop by Main Street Arts to see Gregory Page’s prints in our current exhibition the Upstate New York Printmaking Invitational (runs through October 7).

Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by printmaker Minna Resnick.

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Minna Resnick: Idea to Finished Drawing

My work deals with visual and written language over time, exploring generational differences in the understanding of communication. I use illustrated early and mid-twentieth century manuals on home management, décor, repair, health, education and etiquette for source material and inspiration. This drawing starts with photo illustrations from the 1967 book (pictured below) whose opening sentence reads, “My dear young friend: This, I think, is the book you have been waiting for.” Ha! This text only makes me laugh and initiates the process of reinventing the original source material into something with totally new associations.

book-Seventeen

I use two images from different book chapters and print them on separate sheets of paper in two colors. Both sheets are then covered with a watercolor wash of the same color and the sheets are joined together.

drawing progression

Using a photograph I took of my model, I start drawing over the background with a colored pencil, integrating another layer of information. Here’s more progress:

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I continue adding layers (and obstructing previous ones) as I develop the image…

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…until my idea for the new drawing is complete.

The title of this image is “Learns Much About the World”.

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Stop by Main Street Arts to see Minna Resnick’s prints in our current exhibition the Upstate New York Printmaking Invitational (runs through October 7). View her work online at www.minnaresnick.com

Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by printmaker Kathleen Sherin.

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Kathleen Sherin: Printmaker

U D, Carborundum Monoprint, 19.5 x 9.5 inches

U D, Carborundum Monoprint, 19.5 x 9.5 inches

The prints I have on display at Main Street Arts are part of a new series called “Imeasurable Blues”.

Assembled Carborundum and Collagraphic Monoprint, 25 x 15 inches

Assembled Carborundum and Collagraphic Monoprint, 25 x 15 inches

I create my prints in my studio in the TriMain Building as a resident artist in Buffalo Arts Studio  and larger prints in the printshop at the University of Buffalo through a community access program called ePIC ( Experimental Print Imaging Center).

My studio and press at Buffalo Arts Studio

My studio and press at Buffalo Arts Studio

I always work in series.  Each series is a conversation. These conversations all seem to have a common thread, to explore and express conflicts and contrasts of the physical and mental aspects of being human – or  of the rational and intuitive self. In this current series I have ventured past the border of self to the resonant forces found in nature.

My 10 second statement: “Ideas derived from Biology clash with ideas about Psychology, are mediated by Observation and Experience then completed on an Etching Press”.

The press is an essential tool and partner in creation and  involvement in the process of printing is essential to my creative thinking.

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The prints in this exhibition are Carborundum and Collagraphic Monprints.

A Carborundum  print is made from a calligraphic process in which the image is painted on the plate with carborundum (a gritty abrasive powder) mixed with acrylic medium. Once dried the plate is inked wiped and printed.

The Process of Making a Carborundum Print

A drawing with a liquid acrylic mixed with carborundum in made on  a polystyrene (plastic) plate.

Making the plate -

This plate has combination of lines made with Carborundum and lines made only with acrylic medium.

Close up of plate:

Close up of plate

Once the additions are  dry,  ink (oil-based etching ink) is rubbed onto the plate and into the textured surface of the carborundum lines until the entire plate is covered with ink.

Inking the plate

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Excess ink is wiped off with tarlatan (material like starched cheesecloth).

tarlatan

I leave much  of the ink on the plate –  and the marks in the ink by manually wiping.   It is now ready to print.

readytoprint

Dampened paper is placed over inked plate on the press bed.

wetpaperon

A rubber blanket is placed over paper to cushion and to allow the paper to mold over the raised lines on the plate.

blanket

The print is rolled through the press user pressure.

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A print is born!

printborn

A print and plate.

printandplate

Some of my prints like the following are layered pieces  - This print has ben made with 2 plates, one printed over the  other in a separate run through the press.

W T S O, Carborundum and Collagraphic Monoprint, 24 x 15 inches

W T S O, Carborundum and Collagraphic Monoprint, 24 x 15 inches

This is my thinking and working wall at the studio – I am usually working on several overlapping series at once.

workingwall

This is the other part of my studio filled with prints.  BAS is an open studio space; please feel free to visit.

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Though I have lived and worked in Buffalo NY for many years, I am originally from Greenwich NY.  I moved to Buffalo to attend college first to study nursing (BS in 1972) then continued on to study and make art (BA Empire Sate College 1981, MFA in painting at UB 1985).

I studied intaglio as a post-graduate and  learned traditional printmaking methods. I abandoned these soon to discover through trial and error - simpler materials and more direct, less chemical-mediated ways of working.

My prints are unique, one-of-a-kind, hand-pulled pieces that blend traditions from painting, printmaking and collage. They contain a combination of direct non-chemically-mediated printmaking methods that include my personal spin on collagraphic, carborundum printing and monoprint techniques.


Stop by Main Street Arts to see Kathleen Sherin’s prints in our current exhibition the Upstate New York Printmaking Invitational (runs through October 7). View her work online at www.ksherin.com

Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by printmaker Barbara McPhail.

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Barbara McPhail: Printmaker

I have a small printmaking studio in my home in Canandaigua, which has excellent light and looks out onto the street. My main medium is monotype, although I also use collagraph, linocut, woodblock and etching.

View of my etching press and the street

View of my etching press and the street

My monotypes are mostly created from shapes made from tagboard, and textures like wallpaper, fabric and netting. I start with drawing, but quickly go to designing with shapes as soon as the idea evolves. The shapes are inked up with brayers and placed onto inked plexiglass.

Shapes for "Fire and Ice" on the inking island

Shapes for “Fire and Ice” on the inking island

The print “Fire and Ice” was made of 6 inch square sections that were glued down to form a large print. Below are the sections before I glued them together and added the fire, which was painted paper collaged on at the end.

"Fire and Ice" sections before gluing together

“Fire and Ice” sections before gluing together

Sometimes I overlay images onto an existing print. First I draw out the idea and play with shapes on paper before deciding how I want it to look.

Working out the idea for adding a layer of shapes

Working out the idea for adding a layer of shapes

The beauty of monotype is the fascinating and endless possibilities, which keeps my creative energy flowing and my mind going…going…going.


Stop by Main Street Arts to see Barbara McPhail’s prints in our current exhibition the Upstate New York Printmaking Invitational (runs through October 7). View her work online at http://barbaramcphail.com

Sign up for our workshop: Linocut Printmaking with Barb McPhail.

Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by sculptor Jerry Alonzo.

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Dale Klein

My studio at the Hungerford Building and my etching press

My studio at the Hungerford Building and my etching press

My name is Dale Klein and I am a printmaker and painter. I was born in Buffalo and live and work in Rochester, NY. For 25 years I was a clinical social worker, but I have always been interested in the arts. In 2002 I went back to school and earned a BS in studio art from Nazareth in 2006. In 2010 I received an MFA from Rutgers. I moved back to Rochester in 2011 and have a studio in the Hungerford Building. I also teach at the Creative Workshop at the Memorial Art Gallery.

Lawnmower and Afghan, Aquatint, 18"x12" 2006

Lawnmower and Afghan, Aquatint, 18″x12″ 2006

At Nazareth I was drawn to printmaking because it involves a combination of process and creativity. One of my favorite processes is aquatint, which is how I get the tones in my etchings. This is a process in which I start out with a metal plate (zinc or copper) and progressively dip it into a corrosive acid or salt to etch the plate. The plate is then inked, wiped and printed. I also do  relief (woodcut and linocut), monoprints, and collagraphs.

Chain Link Fence, Aquatint, 18"x12" 2015

Chain Link Fence, Aquatint, 18″x12″ 2015

A sense of the place is essential to my work. My primary interest is in the post-industrial landscape in Western New York State. I see it as a metaphor for the entropy that is inevitable in our world. I am influenced by the Precisionist painters of the early 20th century, Charles Sheeler, Ralston Crawford, and Charles Demuth. There is an irony in their optimism about the industrial revolution that has left us in the developed world with so much detritus, which I find both melancholic and beautiful. I tend to work on the boundary of realism and abstraction. I like the viewer to bring their own preconceptions to the work.

Underpass II Aquatint and Collage 18"x12" 2015

Underpass II Aquatint and Collage 18″x12″ 2015

At Rutgers, I was encouraged to paint and now I paint also. I find that my painting informs my printmaking and vice versa. I have painted in oils for the last few years, but lately have experimented with acrylics. I paint on canvas and wood panels.

Untitled Oil on Canvas 72"x57" 2009

Untitled Oil on Canvas 72″x57″ 2009

Composition I Acrylic on Canvas 36"x48" 2016

Composition I Acrylic on Canvas 36″x48″ 2016

Besides the House and Home exhibit at Main Street Arts I have a piece in the show Echoes of the Past at the University Gallery at RIT, up until August 12. My studio is open most First Fridays, the Hungerford building, 1115 East Main St., Studio 250, 6-9 PM. Please come and visit.


Stop by Main Street Arts to see Dale Klein’s prints in our current exhibition House and Home (runs through August 19). View her work online at www.dalekleinart.com and follow her on Instagram @daleklein7.

Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by sculptor Andrea Scofield Olmstead.

Meet the Artist in Residence: Maria Victoria Savka

Maria Victoria Savka is one of our first artists in residence at Main Street Arts! She’s working in one of our two studio spaces during the month of June 2016 (you can stop by the gallery to see Victoria’s studio and work in progress). We asked Victoria a few questions about her artwork, life, and more:

Maria Victoria Savka

Q: To start this off, would you tell us about your background?

A: I come from Rochester, NY and started doodling since I was much younger and shorter! I graduated with a Fine Arts and Illustration BFA from Rochester Institute of Technology this past May where I began to intensely focus on building a portfolio as well as pushing the limits of my own work. As a recent graduate I am exploring my options and currently browsing employment possibilities.

Q: How would you describe your work?

A: My personal work tends to be what I like calling organized chaos. Movement is key in my work as it provides me with rough, raw, and vivid imagery. I consider gestural images as some of the most genuine; they capture a moment. As an artist I deconstruct images into abstractions, hopping between subjective and objective. I’ve currently been interested the deconstruction of portraits and locations. I hope to it gives a character or narrative to my subjects.

Maria Victoria Savka, "Blueberry Jeepy", watercolor on paper, 8" x 5", 2015

Maria Victoria Savka, “Blueberry Jeepy”, watercolor on paper, 8″ x 5″, 2015

I also have an avid curiosity when it comes to printmaking. I have been in touch with this medium for the past two years and am still very much interested in exploring it further because of the ability to create and experiment with various layers.

Maria Victoria Savka, "Lydia IV", photo intaglio mono print with chine collie, 23" x 15", 2015

Maria Victoria Savka, “Lydia IV”, photo intaglio mono print with chine collie, 23″ x 15″, 2015

Currently I also have multiple small projects of all sorts that tend to be more illustrative nature I am also very excited to work on during this residency!

Q: What is your process for creating a work of art?

A: My personal work starts with a 2-3 minute gestural drawing, a massive amount of loose scribbles. I find seeing the process of a piece intriguing, by seeing the process you are being told the story behind the piece. From that image I build up and create an atmosphere.

A selection of drawings and paintings by Victoria.

A selection of drawings and paintings by Victoria.

Q: What are your goals for this residency? Tell us about your current projects.

A: I would like to continue to explore printmaking. I’d like to continue playing with collage and drypoint, but would also like to dive into more linoleum cuts and perhaps woodcuts as well. Overall, I am very excited to be able to sit down and paint for hours. That is my plan.

Victoria inks a plate for a new print.

Victoria begins inking a plate for a new print.

Adding additional colors to the plate.

Adding additional colors to the plate.

Running the plate through the Main Street Arts printing press.

Running the plate through the Main Street Arts printing press.

The final print!

The final print!

Currently I also have multiple small projects of all sorts that tend to be more whimsical illustrative nature.

Drawings, collages, prints, and more pinned to Victoria's studio wall.

Drawings, collages, prints, and more pinned to Victoria’s studio wall.

Q: What’s next for you?

A: I am planning on going to graduate school in a few years, as I’m interested in teaching as much as I’m interested in making my own artwork. I hope to continue showing my artwork in galleries, and see where the wind takes me!

Q: Where can we find you?

A: You can view my work at www.mariavictoriasavka.com and Instagram @marviccarsav. You can also find my work in the next issues of Rochester’s Lake Affect Magazine and Art House Press Magazine’s second issue coming out in August!


Are you an artist looking for new opportunities? Apply for a residency at Main Street Arts! Artists in residence will have 24-hour access to a large studio on our second floor (with great natural light), the option to show work in the gallery, and the opportunity to teach paid workshops. Submissions are reviewed and awarded on an ongoing basis.

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Dennis Revitzky

Born and raised in northwestern Pennsylvania, I graduated from Gannon and Mercyhurst Colleges with a degree in art education
in 1969. I did graduate study in Fine Arts at SUNY Brockport and taught art for 33 years, most of that time in the Livonia, NY
school district. Along with teaching I was also a professional artist, and upon retirement I was able to devote more time to
my artwork,  mainly printmaking and painting.

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I work from home, where I have my work studio and an office/storage room. The subjects of my art are primarily landscape and the figure. In working with landscape I am always aware of the beauty and essence of the place, and I want to convey the mysterious or spiritual elements of that place. I try to allude to something beyond the physical world we perceive; something we are a part of, but difficult to define or understand.

Strange Morning

In my paintings, I attempt to communicate this through a technique I developed which heavily emphasizes texture. I use modeling paste
and other materials on canvas and then apply an underpainting of a deep violet color over the textured surface. The painting is finished
in oils using brush and palette knife.

Letchworth in Spring

My linocuts are more expressionistic. They are original, hand-pulled prints, usually made in small editions. The color prints are made
with only one or two linoleum blocks which are cut away and printed using the reduction method. Some of the colors may be printed
using a stencil technique. In recent years I’ve also been creating linocut monoprints. All my linocuts are made with oil-base inks on
Rives lightweight paper and are printed by hand using a wooden spoon.

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Pompeii Landscape XI

I am a member of the Society of American Graphic Artists, the Boston Printmakers, and Rochester Contemporary. More of my artwork may be seen at the Mill Art Center, Honeoye Falls, and at various places around the internet.

Stop by Main Street Arts to see Dennis’s artwork in our current exhibition, Fifty Landscapes (runs through May 13). Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by painter Phyllis Bryce Ely.

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Peter Sowiski: Papermaker

I was born in Pittsburgh, trained as a printmaker in Ohio, and spent my teaching career at SUNY Buffalo State. I began making paper for prints almost forty years ago, and since that time have been led down a road of broadened involvement with paper as a medium.

Rooster, 2005, colored pulps, relief, screen print

Rooster, 2005, colored pulps, relief, screen print

The work has been a personal affirmation of both the image and its support, which has formed the basis of my philosophy as a pulp painter- that economy of equipment and processes can yield complexity and sophistication. Looking at military might through these pieces keeps us aware of the high tech, high stakes times we find ourselves in.

Little Bird detail, 2013, colored pulps

Little Bird detail, 2013, colored pulps

I usually work over a base sheet formed in a Nepalese or Asian style. I paint with thin applications of pigmented abaca or cotton fiber. With stock batches of the primaries plus black, I use turkey basters and custom containers for applications of thin washes, enabling quick adjustments of color and consistency. Additionally, I stencil, pour, spray, hand manipulate, or do whatever it takes to drive the image into being. In printed works, I employ traditional processes along with the paper approaches.

pulling base sheet

pulling base sheet

The pieces spring from remembered visions, rooted in diverse sources. I recall my early All-American attraction to weaponry as favorite toys. This connects to my adult fascinations and fears as represented from the late 90′s onward in simple, darker works. I have been making studies of strategic aircraft and service personnel for large installations as well as smaller, intimate print combinations. The works tip a hat to impressionism, photographic “focus,” traditions of printmaking, pattern and pop art, and seek symbiosis between the delicate physical qualities of the paper and the powerful visual qualities of subject, so that they cohere on even terms.

Light Attack, 2013-16, detail, colored pulps

Light Attack, 2013-16, detail, colored pulps

View Peter’s artwork online at www.abaca-press.com/peter/about.html. Stop by Main Street Arts to see his artwork in our current exhibition, Ink and Paper (runs through Friday, March 25). Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by book and multimedia artist Candace Hicks.

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Jenna Rodriguez: An Educator, Papermaker, Printmaker, and Book Artist

I have been an artist and art educator for the past 8 years. The past year and half I was the Victor Hammer Fellow at Wells College Book Arts Center in Aurora, NY. The fellowship allowed me to teach fifty percent of the time and create my own body of work fifty percent of the time.

My work focuses on creating a sense of place within my current geographical location. I attempt to connect with the local community while exploring the public and private experience of social engagement to create work that inspires self-reflection, thoughts, and human connection. Through the use of language and social engagement in the public sphere, I explore everyday life, which opens a dialogue, allowing me to investigate different avenues to create narratives. I seek to give our private thoughts a voice, and our public thoughts an amplifier. By giving them a voice, it empowers their creators and allows us to stop, listen, enjoy and realize that everyone, all around us, drinks from the same cup of humanness. I considers myself a collector, observer, and artist.

Different Spaces  I Create In

When I lived in Chicago I collected authentic thoughts that occur while in commute on public transportation. I asked every stranger that sat next to me on the train to participate. I transformed the project in a letterpress Printed Accordion Book with a downloadable soundscape and a video installation. You can view both pieces here: Running Thoughts

Cayuga Nation: Now & Then is a three hole pamphlet stitch book structure and was offset printed. I printed this book during a residency I had at Columbia College Chicago in the Center for Book and Paper Arts.  Three weeks after I moved to the shores of Cayuga Lake, the local gas station was barricaded with trucks, police and members of the local Cayuga Tribe. This event inspired me to explore the long history of the Cayuga Nation and the events that lead to the recent conflict within the tribe itself. Depending on which cover you open first you receive a different story. One side of the book tells the “Now” story (current issues) and the other side tells the “Then” story (history) of the tribe. I created this two-sided artist book to showcase my own observations, experiences, and research on the Cayuga Nation.

My most recent project is called Still. It memorializes roadkill I encountered in the Finger Lakes of Upstate New York. Moving from Chicago, IL to Aurora, NY I was overwhelmed with my daily encounter of roadkill. The book transforms into a creative non-fiction narrative allowing me to connect with my environment. The deceased animals were found on my daily commute and treated with respect. The cover is handmade paper to resemble asphalt. The book proceeds with an image of crows around an animal to represent the flight of their soul. Following is a pullout map indicating where animals were found. Animals are letterpress printed in two colors with linoleum blocks and polymer plates. A veterinarian allowed me to take x-rays, which are printed on transparent paper with vertical text stating statistics about roadkill. Each animal has an obituary that states factual and humorous information with a pullout photograph showing the crime scene and the longitude and latitude. At the end of the project a private ceremony was held where the animals were buried on an island to pay respect and give thanks.

My Process for “Still”

Final Product

This project has turned into something much larger than only an artist book. I have created handmade paper using the animals, I created an animation about the animals, I created screen-prints of the animals and then did embroidery work on top of the  prints. All of this work will be in a solo exhibition called Still at The String Room Gallery at Wells College in Aurora, NY. If you you are in the area you should come for the opening in Mid April.

View Jenna’s artwork online at www.jennarodriguez.com. Stop by Main Street Arts to see Jenna’s artwork in our current exhibition, Ink and Paper. The exhibition is up through Friday, March 25. Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by book artist Alicia Taylor.

Inside the Studio with Rebecca Lomuto: Beyond the Medium

silver gelatin, 2014

silver gelatin, 2014

I have always been concerned with the human figure as a subject. My photographs began as dreary and lovely, using friends as models or rather, place holders. I became less fascinated by the person and more by the form. Eventually, while studying overseas in Florence, Italy, I became less reliant on others to provide that shape and more interested in how to use my own body in my compositions. Thus began a long photographic journey in self-portraiture.

from the series, Between the Real and the Imagined. 2013

from the series, Between the Real and the Imagined. 2013

Soft ground and aquatint on zinc. 2015

Soft ground and aquatint on zinc. 2015

Previously, I had studied etching and book arts at a very casual level during undergrad— it seemed to be just an outlet for my frustrations, when a photographic project was still in its developmental stage. It was exciting to learn new techniques and to relate them to what I already know; I still believe that my initial draw to making etchings was because of the similarities in the richness of tone and value in between an etching and a photograph.

phototransfer, aquatint on zinc. 2013

phototransfer, aquatint on zinc. 2013

After graduation, while traveling, I found myself printing cyanotypes from my bedroom, until I became involved with the Community Darkroom at the Genesee Center for the Arts and Education. It was there that I began playing with my collected images from a year out of school. Eventually, I stumbled upon the Printing and Book Arts area, possibly during the phase where I was putting images in books— and inquired about the space. Being predominantly a letterpress shop, I spoke to Mitch Cohen at length about how how plausible and fruitful it would be to incorporate a greater variety of printmaking processes in our studio.

aquatint on zinc. 2015.

aquatint on zinc. 2015.

After establishing residency in the shop, and following Mitch’s lead (he’d acquired two etching presses that I currently use), I did my research. I visited other studios, both communal and private; worked alongside other printers, such as Bernice Cross, and began bringing in the materials to produce my own copper-etched plates at PABA. From my year as an artist in residence to today, we have been adjusting our studio to accommodate the ever-growing interest in creating etchings. It seems like our classes near-doubled in size since our very first etching class late 2014.

aquatint on copper, 2016

aquatint on copper, 2016

inked copper plates on the press bed from the book Speckles of Spit, a collaboration with writer Gregory Sutherland.

inked copper plates on the press bed from the book Speckles of Spit, a collaboration with writer Gregory Sutherland.

Working in a community space has been incredibly influential to my work. There is heart within the space and always another eye to offer feedback on something in the works. I often work with different types of artists, either visual or literary, on different book commissions. They provide the content and I build the book (sometimes, even incorporating my own imagery).

Community has become so important to me that I have developed a collaborative project, to extend the same experience to friends who do not have access to a community as vibrant that I take part in daily. (www.print-a-month.tumblr.com)

aquatint on copper. 2016

aquatint on copper. 2016

While I do tend to focus on using surreal imagery throughout each medium in my work, I find that my etchings tend to be more fairy-tale like. I often wake from a dream, with a feeling or a vision that influences the images that I print. Floating figures, abnormal interactions all come together by the enchanting effects of aquatint, soft ground, and some experimental processes. Currently, I am researching and playing with the ability to interchange photographic, printmaking and other processes to create one unified body of work.

A Glimmer, from the series We See Ourselves in Shadows. altered liquid light emulsion on papyrus. 2016

A Glimmer, from the series We See Ourselves in Shadows. altered liquid light emulsion on papyrus. 2016

archival inkjet print sewn on fabric. 2015.

archival inkjet print sewn on fabric. 2015.

View Rebecca’s artwork online at www.rebeccalomuto.com. Stop by Main Street Arts to see Rebecca’s prints in our current exhibition, Ink and Paper. The exhibition is up through Friday, March 25. Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by Rochester book artist Sue Huggins Leopard.