Tag Archives: Flora and Fauna

Inside The Artist’s Studio with Emily Glass

I spent my childhood outside in rural Vermont, taking care of animals and watching wildlife grow. As a kid I photographed my surrounding world extensively, always documenting, always looking. I loved art classes in high school and first worked with oil paint at the State University of New York Potsdam in 2004.  I found the challenge of oil exciting and completely engrossing.

24 by 42.5 inches, Oil on Canvas, 2015

I Discard (in progress during the residency), 24 by 42.5 inches, Oil on Canvas, 2015

I think of my work as a mix of abstraction and realism.  With it, I seek to communicate subtle narrative and commentary on our current culture. I am beginning a shift into using more plant-based imagery and questioning what it means to have a particular plant on a dinner table or in a yard.  The privileges and beliefs that come with iceberg lettuce versus arugula (or dandelion leaves versus cabbage) reveal differences in class systems and political associations.

My residency studio at the Vermont Studio Center

My studio at the Vermont Studio Center

In the Flora and Fauna exhibition, four paintings were started at a residency at Vermont Studio Center (VSC) in June 2015.

Here is an excerpt from my time there:

While parts of the country were fighting drought, the Vermont sky opened up with rain.  I would keep the windows open, breath in the wet air and paint for hours.  When the rain broke (about every two days or so), I was exhausted from painting and needed to think before beginning again. During those breaks in the rain I spent my time walking, writing and reading outside, documenting what caught my eye and turning over thoughts. Everything was so green, so rich.

Studio Workbench

Studio Workbench

It was summer but the rainy days were cold. I wore a fleece hat and kept an extra pair of dry socks in my studio for the next rainfall painting session.

I have only mentioned my working habits at the residency, which was one half of the experience.  The other half were the 45 or so wonderful visual artists and writers that were also residing at VSC and whom I shared my meals with.  The experience is one I recommend to anyone looking for a nourishing and intensive space to develop work.

My Agent Says the Neighbors are Nice, Oil Paint on Canvas, 43 by 180 inches, 2014

My Agent Says the Neighbors are Nice, Oil Paint on Canvas, 43 by 180 inches, 2014

During the year I teach painting and drawing at Rochester Institute of Technology and spend as much time as possible in my home studio, developing oily canvases and putting together plans for future works.

View Emily’s artwork online at emilyglassart.com. Stop by Main Street Arts to see Emily’s work in our current exhibition, Flora and Fauna. The exhibition is up through Friday, February 12. Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by encaustic painter Kristen T. Woodward.

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Kristen T. Woodward

Lucky foot (except for the rabbit)

A native of Rochester NY, I’m delighted to have the opportunity to exhibit my work at Main Street Arts. On display in the current Flora and Fauna exhibition are 16  encaustic paintings on wooden panels. The imagery involves abstracted animal forms, often referencing parables and children’s games.

Donkey Games

A small installation in the show also features a full scale deer target and small paintings on Black Forest carved antler plaques.

 painting on antler plaque

Painting on Black Forest carved antler plaque

While on a trip to Germany as a visiting artist last fall I encountered these plaques which included antlers from Roe deer. I found them beautiful and fascinating, and thought they would make provocative supports for small paintings that explored landscape and our sensory relationship to the natural world.

Can you guess whose lips served as a model?

All things are possible, 14x17, mixed media on wood

All things are possible, 14×17, mixed media on wood

As a Professor of Art at Albright College in Reading, PA I teach a wide variety of painting and printmaking processes, but of late I have been personally attracted to the encaustic medium (download my encaustic recipe).

wax in solid form

wax in solid form

This image shows the refined beeswax from an art supply store (it comes yellow or white) next to an unmodified block from a local beekeeper. The local brown block contains a good bit of slub gum, an impurity (bee poop).

encaustic cans on a hot plate

encaustic cans

This last image shows a skillet filled up with a bunch of small mixed colors. I have another skillet for just white and soy wax, which is used for cleaning some of the wax out of the brushes.

I’m also actively writing short reviews for  www.artists2artists.net
You can see my artist2artist page here.

Stop by Main Street Arts to see Kristen’s work in our current exhibition, Flora and Fauna. The exhibition is up through Friday, February 12. Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by watercolor artist E.L. Ryan.