Tag Archives: Canandaigua Artist

Meet the Artist in Residence: Drew Tetz

Drew Tetz is an artist in residence at Main Street Arts. He’s working in one of our two studio spaces during the months of March 2017 (you can stop by the gallery to see his studio and works in progress). We asked Drew a few questions about his artwork, life, and more:

Artist in Residence Drew Tetz

Artist in Residence Drew Tetz

Q: To start this off, tell us about your background.

A: I live in Canandaigua, NY, but I’m originally from Silver Spring, MD (right outside of DC.) I got a BFA in Graphic Design at Andrews University before dipping a toe in the freelance life as a designer & professional yo-yoer. Eventually, I moved up to the Finger Lakes to be with my boo, Melissa Huang. I currently work as an elementary classroom aide while keeping up with design clients, personal art, & my hi-fi yo-yo brand.

A flatpack kendama designed by Drew Tetz

A flatpack kendama designed by Drew Tetz

The Rhythm by Drew's company 44rpm

The Rhythm by Drew’s company 44rpm

Drew showing us a few yoyo tricks in the residency studio

Drew showing us a few yoyo tricks in the residency studio

Q: How would you describe your work?

A: I work with a lot of toys, lasercut wood, & rotating objects. It’s really fun to make art that people can play with, especially if it inspires them to go on & make stuff of their own. For this reason, I’ve been especially drawn to things like papercraft & flatpack design.

My current obsession is a pre-cinema animation toy called “the phenakistoscope.” It’s basically rotating disc using a series of slits to create the illusion of motion, similar to a zoetrope. In this day & age, the flickering can be recreated at home with the help of a turntable, some bright lights, & a camera. The turntable spins the disc at a consistent rate, which blends the frames into a moving image when viewed through the camera’s shutter speed.

The word I hear used to describe my work most often is, for better or worse, “trippy.” I will admit that it is fairly trippy.

Drew shows us his phenakistoscope (animated record) at the gallery

Drew shows us his phenakistoscope (animated record) at the gallery

One of Drew's phenakistoscopes

One of Drew’s phenakistoscopes

Q: What is your process for creating a work of art?

A: When creating a phenakistoscope, I generally start by figuring out what subject matter I want & how long I want the loops to be, which determines which speed will work best. I also like to decide early on whether there will be any “tricks” or extra motion in the disc so that I can plan for the varying framerates & processes. This is usually enough to establish a rough mental map of both the final static image & the animation.

From there, I can start in on cropping & chopping the source clips up on laptop before exporting the individual frames into a film strip. Then, using a program like Photoshop, I bend the frames into a connected circle & process the image for maximum legibility. It’s a lot of computer mumbo-jumbo, basically.

I actually wrote a tutorial on phenakistoscopes for Make: magazine about making an original animation from scratch instead of working from video frames. (That article also features a few you can download & print if you’d like to try it at home!)

Drew Tetz with a lasercut portrait

Drew Tetz with a lasercut portrait in his residency studio

Q: What are your goals for this residency? Tell us about your current projects.

A: I’ve had an unusually busy month following my animated business cards going slightly viral, so my focus has been unexpectedly widened to accommodate new clients & collaborators. Between these unexpected projects, I’d like to find the time to expand on the printable animated coloring pages, I love them as an interactive project for artists of all ages. (You can try out the Wiener Dog Wiggle Wheel coloring sheet for yourself at the gallery!)

Stickers for 44rpm and Drew's new animated business cards!

Stickers for 44rpm and Drew’s new animated business cards!

Q: What’s next for you?

A: More animation collaborations with as many artists as I can manage, a few LP labels on real vinyl, slipmats & relief prints… seeing how far I can push this funky medium!

Detail image of a phenakistoscope by Drew

Detail image of a phenakistoscope by Drew

Q: Where else can we find you?

A: My portfolio is up at drewtetz.com, but for a running up-to-date look at my work I’d check out my instagram. (In particular, I try to catalogue my phenakistoscopes with the hashtag #tetzoscope, so check that out for more animated records.) I also run a high-end yo-yo brand called 44RPM.


Are you an artist looking for new opportunities? Apply for a residency at Main Street Arts! Artists in residence will have 24-hour access to a large studio on our second floor (with great natural light), the option to show work in the gallery, and the opportunity to teach paid workshops. Housing is available. Submissions are reviewed and residencies awarded quarterly.

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Barbara McPhail: Printmaker

I have a small printmaking studio in my home in Canandaigua, which has excellent light and looks out onto the street. My main medium is monotype, although I also use collagraph, linocut, woodblock and etching.

View of my etching press and the street

View of my etching press and the street

My monotypes are mostly created from shapes made from tagboard, and textures like wallpaper, fabric and netting. I start with drawing, but quickly go to designing with shapes as soon as the idea evolves. The shapes are inked up with brayers and placed onto inked plexiglass.

Shapes for "Fire and Ice" on the inking island

Shapes for “Fire and Ice” on the inking island

The print “Fire and Ice” was made of 6 inch square sections that were glued down to form a large print. Below are the sections before I glued them together and added the fire, which was painted paper collaged on at the end.

"Fire and Ice" sections before gluing together

“Fire and Ice” sections before gluing together

Sometimes I overlay images onto an existing print. First I draw out the idea and play with shapes on paper before deciding how I want it to look.

Working out the idea for adding a layer of shapes

Working out the idea for adding a layer of shapes

The beauty of monotype is the fascinating and endless possibilities, which keeps my creative energy flowing and my mind going…going…going.


Stop by Main Street Arts to see Barbara McPhail’s prints in our current exhibition the Upstate New York Printmaking Invitational (runs through October 7). View her work online at http://barbaramcphail.com

Sign up for our workshop: Linocut Printmaking with Barb McPhail.

Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post by sculptor Jerry Alonzo.

Q & A with Kate Symonds

The Upstate New York Ceramics Invitational at Main Street Arts will feature functional and sculptural ceramic work by 13 artists from the region. This invitational represents some of the most exciting contemporary ceramic work being made in upstate New York.

The exhibition will be held July 11–August 29, 2015.
Online purchasing will begin in mid-July.

Kate Symonds

Canandaigua ceramic artist Kate Symonds

Kate Symonds

Q: Where are you from originally and where are you now?
A: I was born and raised in Canandaigua NY. I lived in Rochester, California, Colorado and now live in my hometown as the proprietor and potter at Coach Street Clay.

Q: When did you realize you wanted to be a ceramic artist?
A: I realized that I wanted to be a ceramic artist freshman year of college.  It was the material, the community of the ceramic studio, and the challenge of learning to center and build with clay. One semester of this and I was hooked.  It was in the “Professional Craft Business Practices” class at RIT that I came up with the idea to renovate a barn into a studio, gallery and living space. A few years passed, I did a couple artist residences, waited on tables and started looking for property to buy.  There it was!  I found an old dilapidated barn in downtown Canandaigua in 2007. As a carpenter’s daughter I could see the potential in this property.  After about three years of blood, sweat, and renovation tears I was in business. Coach Street Clay opened in October 2010.

Q: Did you make other types of artwork before finding ceramics? Do you currently make other work?
A: I first went to college for fine arts. I was into drawing and painting and figurative work. When I found clay my focus was sculptural. I became interested in making pots while at my Genesee Pottery residency. At an Anderson Ranch winter residency I jumped in to making pots and never looked back.

Q: Do you have an artistic hero or an artist you look up to?
Just one hero? No. I have immense admiration for all of the mothers and fathers who are makers and entrepreneurs. Raising a child while cultivating a business through art and clay requires more all nighters in the studio than most believe to be humanly possible. Stories of other mothers doing it too is motivating.

Q: What is your largest source of inspiration?
A: Springtime, gardening, nature walks, lake swimming, my daughter Sylah’s perspective.

Q: Do you look forward to opening the kiln? Or do you wince at the thought of something going wrong in there?
A: I love opening the kiln! When things go wrong, therein lies good information. Most of the time things go right at this point. Unless of course I have the time to experiment and push things a bit, but still that is where the good work comes from.

Q: What is it like being a ceramic artist in Upstate NY?
A: I have found my place in the world as the village potter in downtown Canandaigua in the beauty of the Finger Lakes. It is a dream that continues to unfold as my business is welcomed and supported by the local people. Coach Street Clay has become part of the community here. My story is told and re-told as my pots continue find homes in Canandaigua, the Fingers Lakes and beyond.

Q: Where else are you showing your work this summer or fall?
Coach Street Clay’s retail gallery is open to the public 5 days a week. I will also be showing at regional juried craft shows such as Craft Alliance in Chautauqua NY, Clothesline in Rochester, and others.

Q: Is there anything strange or unique that people might not know about you?
A: I’ve always had a thing for climbing trees. Many of my childhood memories involve tree climbing. I still climb trees when the mood strikes. Another thing, my 6 year old daughter Sylah and I are learning to play the violin together.

Teapot by Kate Symonds

Teapot by Kate Symonds

Mug by Kate Symonds

Mug by Kate Symonds

Mug by Kate Symonds

Mug by Kate Symonds

Bowl by Kate Symonds

Bowl by Kate Symonds

Vase by Kate Symonds

Vase by Kate Symonds

Where can people see more of your work/follow you?
Website: www.coachstreetclay.com

Check out the previous Q & A with ceramic artist Kala Stein.

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Melissa Huang

Painting is a very relaxing process for me. It’s the one thing that  clears my mind and allows me to focus. Painting is great for brainstorming and letting your mind work through all of the thoughts and concepts swimming around in your head.

My studio space is currently set up in the living room area. The natural light is something I really enjoy.

My studio space is currently set up in the living room area. The natural light is something I really enjoy.

A lot of my artwork focuses on things like trinkets, porcelain dolls, and other beautiful childhood objects. I’ve always been a collector, and I filled a bookcase full of fossils, crystals, and ornaments when I was younger.

Artists like Audrey Flack have greatly influenced the way I view still lifes. Symbolism is very important in Flack’s work, and I try to focus on the symbolism in my work as well.

Melissa Huang, Self Portrait, Oil on canvas, wood frame, sculpy objects, 48" x 36" plus frame, 2012

Melissa Huang, Self Portrait, Oil on canvas, wood frame, sculpy objects, 48″ x 36″ plus frame, 2012

I enjoy painting from life, but find creating photographic reference images to work from really helps my process. By rearranging objects and photographing them in different situations and different angles I can find compositions that capture the emotional intent of the piece.

My oil paintings are intentionally soft and feminine with melancholy undercurrents. Broken dolls and figures intertwine with bright and colorful flowers that could represent new life, or possibly death. We are intruders, viewing these figures from an intimate perspective.

Melissa Huang, In the Flowers, Oil on canvas, 24" x 18", 2014

Melissa Huang, In the Flowers, Oil on canvas, 24″ x 18″, 2014

Melissa Huang, Muhammad, Oil on canvas, 20" x 20", 2014

Melissa Huang, Muhammad, Oil on canvas, 20″ x 20″, 2014

Melissa Huang, Sammy Mouse, Oil on canvas, 20" x 20", 2014

Melissa Huang, Sammy Mouse, Oil on canvas, 20″ x 20″, 2014

Recently I’ve been using gold leaf in my paintings. During my study abroad in Florence I visited as many churches as possible, and saw many beautiful altarpieces with gold leafed panels. The subjects of the paintings were made more important by the glimmering leaf. I wanted to lend a similar sense of importance to the subjects I painted.

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Melissa Huang, Philip, Oil on canvas, 48" x 36", 2013

Melissa Huang, Philip, Oil on canvas, 48″ x 36″, 2013

Melissa Huang, Garden, Oil on panel, gold leaf, 6" x 6" (each), 2014

Melissa Huang, Garden, Oil on panel, gold leaf, 6″ x 6″ (each), 2014

Using gold leaf in my work allowed me to play with a sense of depth versus flatness, as well as brought a more graphic quality into some of my paintings. If you’d like to learn about the gold leafing process I’ll be leading a gold leaf workshop at Main Street Arts on Saturday, February 21st, from 1–3pm. This workshop relates to the current Solid Gold exhibition, featuring nine artists using gold leaf, gold paint, and gold lustre.

Working on paintings on gold leafed panels

Working on paintings on gold leafed panels

Melissa Huang, The Aviary, Oil on panel, gold leaf, 6" x 6" (each), 2014

Melissa Huang, The Aviary, Oil on panel, gold leaf, 6″ x 6″ (each), 2014

Come see Melissa’s paintings in person during Solid Gold, or check out her upcoming exhibition Upstairs at Main Street Arts.

You can see more of Melissa’s portfolio at www.melissahuang.com or on Instagram: @melissahuangart. Take a look at our previous Inside the Artist’s Studio blog post, by painter Amy Vena.