Tag Archives: Painter

Inside the Artist’s studio with Adriano Valeri

Me in the studio

Me in the studio

My name is Adriano Valeri, and I’m participating in Main Street Arts show de/composition!

I was born in Milan, Italy, and when I was eight years old my family relocated to Quincy, MA, a working class city south of Boston. As a birthday present one year, my parents enrolled me in an after school art class held in the basement of a frame shop. It was a great way to bond with other young artists and helped me adjust to my new environment. The teacher was an academically trained portrait painter. She was very affectionate with the kids, but also held us to a high standard. She taught us to use acrylic and oil paints, which I still favor to this day. Overall, I feel the experience was fundamental to my development as an artist.

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My studio space

After graduating from a county vocational high school where I had specialized in arborculture, I choose to return to Italy and to further my education in the arts. I was accepted to the State Academy of Arts in Venice and spent the next 10 years studying and working both there and in the surrounding region. I learned to be more inquisitive and intellectually engaged as an artist. Although I have stuck with traditional techniques such as oil on canvas, it’s important for me that the paintings acknowledge critical issues of our time and to ensure the medium remains fresh and surprising.

After having completed my undergraduate and masters degree, in addition to several artists residencies, I opted to move to New York City and to further my career in the United States. I’ve lived in NYC for fours years now, working on my paintings in Brooklyn. My studio is a spacious drywall cubicle with a large table and some small desks. There’s a window that overlooks a busy highway and some empty lots and the whole floor is occupied by artists and craftspeople. Inside I like to find a balance between creative messiness and impractical clutter. On the tables, paper plates crusted in oil paints vie for space with sketches and photographs, while the walls are thronged with completed paintings.

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View from the studio

As a child, painting and drawing was a way for me to express my fascination with animals and wild places. As an adult, I chose to paint subjects drawn from everyday experiences with the urban environment. Plants, construction material, feral animals, litter. We live in a globalized and rapidly homogenizing world, and I want to make paintings which can resonate with people across the globe.

I think we as a species have never before been as psychologically disconnected from the land we inhabit. The production of food and consumer goods is internationalized and largely automated. Internal and international migration, displacement for economic reasons or from social and natural calamities,  and the evolution of our mentality and social patterns of behavior contribute to a massive distancing from the organic process which occur around us. 

What I’m really interested in is bringing the viewer’s focus to  the land we inhabit. I’m not interested in making work that is purely documentary — I’m interested in how these marginal spaces teem with unintended interactions that result from our massive presence as a species, so I’ve developed a personal narrative style to convey that. I love how trees can absorb and deform a chain-link fence. It reminds me of the incessant action of biology, this weak force that is constantly at work everywhere, and is assimilating everything we shed.

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The painting “Belgian Planters” which is currently on view in de/composition at Main Street Arts

I’m excited to have been selected for the show de/composition at Main Street Arts! Since this is a recurring theme that I acknowledge  in my painting, it was exciting to see how the other participating artists approach this topic in different media and from different perspectives and practices.

You can find more information about me and images of my work at adrianovaleri.com


Adriano Valeri  is one of 31 artists featured in the national juried exhibition de/composition at Main Street Arts. Work from the exhibition can be previewed and purchased through the gallery’s online shopde/composition runs through June 28, 2019.

Inside The Artist’s Studio with Chad Cleveland

Self-portrait, Acrylic on board

Self-portrait, Acrylic on board

I grew up in Fairport, N.Y.  and I’ve been making art since my early 20’s.  Having grown up heavily involved in sports, I never really created much artwork through my younger academic years.

It was in my undergraduate program at Binghamton University that I decided to be an artist. It’s funny because I had never painted before, but I was sure that’s what I wanted to do in life.

"Passing Through", painting included in the "de/composition" exhibition at Main Street Arts

“Passing Through”, painting included in the “de/composition” exhibition at Main Street Arts

After diving into the art program  head  first I quickly realized that I was a terrible painter. My drawings were strong but I had a hard time converting my ideas into the world of paint. However, I was advised and encouraged by my instructor, mentor, artist, and friend Dave Shapiro. He was an extremely gifted artist who worked under the tutelage  of Philip Guston  at one point in his career.  He insisted that I was indeed on the right path, and with hard enough work  I could get to where I wanted to be.

It was because of his encouragement and support that I attended the Rochester Institute of Technology for my MFA in painting and drawing, and eventually an MST in Art Education.

"Bill", work in progress

“Bill”, work in progress

I was fortunate enough to be exposed to many different gifted artists and professors at RIT. This lead me to experiment with a variety of different media and techniques, and exposed me to ideas that were very foreign, yet extremely exciting. This was when I met another extremely important artist, guide and mentor in my life by the name of Bill Stephens. He has been paramount in the development of myself as an artist and human being.

"The Crow", work in progress

“The Crow”, work in progress

My current body of work consists of variations and experimentation with the human portrait.  Throughout my career I have ventured back-and-forth between the world of abstraction/non-objective art and representational/figurative art forms.  So it is now that I find myself  at the marriage of these two worlds.  I find that each piece leads to the next, and serves as a jumping off point for the next idea.

For more of my work, follow me on Instagram @chad_cleveland.art


Chad Cleveland is one of 31 artists featured in the national juried exhibition de/composition at Main Street Arts. Work from the exhibition can be previewed and purchased through the gallery’s online shopde/composition runs through June 28, 2019.

Meet the Artist in Residence: Rachel Siminoski

Rachel Siminoski, artist in residence at Main Street Arts during the month of March 2019, is working in one of our two studio spaces on our second floor. We asked Rachel some questions about her work and studio practice:

Rachel Siminoski

Rachel Siminoski

Q: Please you tell us about your background.
I grew up in a small town in central Ohio, and after graduating high school I went to the University of North Carolina at Greensboro for my BS in biology. During my sophomore year I decided that as much as I loved science (and still do!), it wasn’t what I wanted to pursue. I graduated with my BFA in drawing and printmaking, worked at an art gallery for a year, and recently I’ve been working for a screen printing company in the Charlotte area. I also started an online art magazine called Reciprocal in 2017, and I’m currently working on the fourth issue.

Rachel's studio

Rachel’s studio

Q: How would you describe your work?
My work stems from my interest in biological systems and the intersection of protection and separation. Most of my paintings depict ambiguous enclosures in which biomorphic and structural forms interact symbiotically. While I’m influenced by various structures that I see on a daily basis (fences, enclosures, walls, etc.), I’m not actively attempting to depict anything from life. I’m more interested in the function that those forms are associated with- such as protecting, covering, holding, or supporting the things around it.

"Octagonal", 2018, acrylic on canvas, 36.25  27 inches

“Octagonal”, 2018, acrylic on canvas, 36.25 x 27 inches


Q: What is your process for creating a work of art?
I start with small, simple sketches, although I never feel obligated to stick with my original plan. I like to work on multiple pieces at a time- if I try to focus on just one image, I feel like I end up drowning in ideas that don’t belong crammed together in one single painting. I also like to stop and take a moment to write about what I’m working on, ask myself questions about the decisions I’ve made so far, and gain some clarity on where I want to take the painting next.

Q: What are your goals for this residency?
I’ve been thinking about how things evolve over time, and how the abstract characters and environments within my paintings fit into that idea. I think in the past I’ve thought about each of my paintings as separate, individual representations, whereas now I’m more curious about how they interact in relation to one another, and depicting them in a way that makes them seem less static.

I’ve also been playing with the temperature of the grays that I mix, and I want to explore how I can push that further while still staying true to the parameters that I set for my work. I’m hoping to continue exploring these ideas and make some smaller paintings that will lead to larger works once I get back to my studio in North Carolina.

Per Kirkeby

Per Kirkeby

Q: Who is your favorite artist and why? Who are your favorite local artists?
I really love Per Kirkeby’s paintings. He made sure to emphasize the importance of having structure within a painting, and that has always resonated with me. A few of my favorite North Carolina artists include Felicia van Bork, Marvin Saltzman, and Mariam Stephan.

Untitled, 2018, acrylic on canvas, 36 x 28 inches

Untitled, 2018, acrylic on canvas, 36 x 28 inches

Q: What was your experience like at art school?
I had an amazing experience in school. My professors were tough yet supportive, and I was surrounded by talented and driven peers. The environment wasn’t competitive in an unhealthy way like I think some people assume.

"Small Enclosure 2", 2018, acrylic on canvas, 8 x 10 inches

“Small Enclosure 2″, 2018, acrylic on canvas, 8 x 10 inches


Q: What’s next for you?
That’s a big question! Hopefully I’ll be attending more residencies later on this year. I’m also starting to think about going back to school for an MFA in painting, so we’ll see where that leads me!

Q: Where else can we find you?
You can find me on instagram, or on my website www.rachelsiminoski.com

Meet the Artist in Residence: Jamie Moriarty

Jamie Moriarty, artist in residence at Main Street Arts during the month of January 2019, is working in one of our two studio spaces on our second floor. We asked Jamie some questions about her work and studio practice:

Artist Jamie Moriarty

Artist Jamie Moriarty

Q: Please tell us about your background:
I’ve lived in Florida most my life. I started out with film photography in high school and then moved to digital photography and photoshop. However, once I got to college I started painting and sculpting which is when I really started to make artwork. I got my associate’s degree at the State College of Florida where I had access to a wonderful ceramics studio. After graduating I decided to go to New College of Florida. All of the sudden I found myself without clay and a kiln and that’s the moment that my art started to take off in a whole new direction.

"Tilt-Axis Accelerometer" Oil on panel; 5x5 in; 2018

“Tilt-Axis Accelerometer” Oil on panel; 5×5 in; 2018

Q: How would you describe your work?
My first love is sculpture, but I’ve been focused more on painting as of late. Most of my portfolio consists of interactive sculptures. Either via a sensor, button, or other mechanism, the artwork is activated and altered in order to talk about the ways in which we interact with technology and how such interactions influence us. I started out in this genre with simple buttons and relays, but I’ve been expanding into more complex programming. Recently, I’ve been working a lot with computer vision, the field that deals with getting computers to understand and interpret visual images.

"Finger Study No. 3" PLA, MDF, micro servo, Arduino nano, LED, potentiometer, circuitry; 9x4x3.5 in; 2018; When dial is turned, the finger bends.

“Finger Study No. 3″ PLA, MDF, micro servo, Arduino nano, LED, potentiometer, circuitry; 9x4x3.5 in; 2018; When dial is turned, the finger bends.

Q: What is the most useful tool in your studio?
I feel somewhat compelled to say a computer, but they never really work so I’d have to go with my speakers or headphones. As my medium changes, I’m always listening to music or an audiobook.

Q: What type of music do you listen to and how does music affect your artwork?
That being said, I love listening to rap, jazz, indie, instrumentals, and everything in between. When I get bored of music I listen to informative non-fiction audiobooks. I find that music helps to keep me on a certain pace or in the right mind set. Although I love audiobooks, they make me work much slower.

"Camera Module" Oil on canvas; 34x28 in; 2018.

“Camera Module” Oil on canvas; 34×28 in; 2018.

Q: What is your process for creating a work of art?
I envy the days when I would just start painting out of the blue. Now, my process starts out very conceptually, I have a very good idea of my end product before I begin creating. My paintings start out with very meticulous reference photos, you really don’t see my hand until you get up close. However, it’s my programming works that wind up changing a lot throughout the process, but that is mostly due to the learning process.

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Paintings in progress in Jamie’s studio

Q: What was your experience like at art school?
I’ve really been struggling with the way that art school has altered my practice. The school I am at is more of a liberal arts college and the art program is firmly rooted in the world of academia. I have become so conditioned to think primarily about the conceptual that aesthetics is always optional and expression weakens the idea. The worst part is that you don’t realizes the changes that happen until they become damaging. I’ve been trying to unlearn some these constraints in order to go back to a more natural process of creation.

"RPi Zero Camera Module" Oil on canvas; 36x11.75 in; 2018.

“RPi Zero Camera Module” Oil on canvas; 36×11.75 in; 2018.

Q: What are your goals for this residency?
I’ve been animating my sculptures with electronic components for quite some time, but my paintings have remained the same. My goal for this residency is to find new ways of making my two dimensional works more interactive.

photo of taking photo

Q: What’s next for you?
I will be graduating this spring and after that I plan to move to a bigger city and focus on making work outside of the academic environment. I plan to get my master’s but I want to spend more time discovering myself as an artist first.

Q: Where else can we find you?
My website is jamiemoriarty.com and my Instagram is @jamie_michelle_moriarty. All my fun and frustration in the process gets posted to my Instagram account.

Meet the Artist in Residence: Meredith Olinger

Meredith Olinger, artist in residence at Main Street Arts during the month of October 2018, is working in one of our two studio spaces on our second floor. We asked Meredith some questions about her work and studio practice:

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Meredith Olinger

Q: Tell us about your background.
I’m from Memphis, TN. I recently obtained my M.F.A. from Memphis College of Art. I am a mixed media artist. For the past two years I have been designing my own wallpaper, creating it both digitally and by hand, and using that to collage large scale installation pieces. I also work in printmaking, painting, and textiles.

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Room #1, mixed media, 2017

Q: How would you describe your work?
My work is very layered, both in physicality and content. I’m very interested in the intersections of art and design, painting and installation, digital and handmade. My work blurs these lines. Aesthetically, I’m looking for something bombastic and overwhelming. I’m inspired by advertising, billboards, interiors and  social media.

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Room #1 Reconfigured: Front, mixed media, 2017

Q: What is your process for creating a work of art?
All of my wallpapers are of my own design. I create them digitally and have them printed by Spoonflower, or I create them by hand, using painting, printmaking, drawing, etc. These are then layered onto a surface and then I rip away at them. I often collage these pieces back on, working until the piece feels right. I also photograph my work while it is in process, make a wallpaper pattern out of that, and then collage it into the work.

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Room #1 Reconfigured: Back, mixed media, 2017

Q: What are your goals for this residency?
During this residency, I am focusing solely on painting. My background is in painting, but I have been so focused on collage for the past few years that working with oil has been very challenging for me. My goal this month is to get re-acquainted with the medium.

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Detail, oil on panel, 2017

Q: Who is your favorite artist and why?
I have so many favorite artists! El Anatsui, Amy Sillman, Mark Bradford, and Nick Cave are just a few of my favorites. But recently, I’ve been very interested in Elliot Hundley’s work. Though it’s very different from mine, the way he works in layers is similar to my own process. I also love how dense his work is, and that is something I strive for in my own work.

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Untitled (Zeitgeist Installation), mixed media on wall, 2018

Q: What advice would you give to other artists?
I’ve had so many great professors over the years, and they have all graciously given me so much wisdom. But one professor in particular once told me to, “trust the process.” Simple really, but I repeat it to myself a lot in the studio. It’s so easy to get bogged down in your work. Art making is hard and you have good days and bad days. You have to remember that it’s all part of the process. The struggle is important for making your best work.

Q: Do you collect artwork? Tell us about your collection.
I do collect artwork! My collection is small, but has some really great pieces by artists I love. I own a few pieces from some of my cohorts from graduate school: Katherine Dean, Joseph Mosely, and Mary Ruth Pruitt. I also own a piece of one of my professors, Beth Edwards, a fantastic Memphis painter. I also own some antique Chinese peasant paintings that I bought for a song because I don’t think their owner knew how amazing they were! I try to pick up prints when I can, and am looking to add a Chuck Johnson and a Greely Myatt (two local Memphis artists) to my collection in the near future.

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Untitled 1, mixed media, 2018

Q: What’s next for you?
I recently started showing my work with Binder Projects, an online gallery, so I am excited to see how that relationship develops. I’ll be teaching in the Fashion Design Certificate Program at Memphis College of Art in the Spring, and I have some workshops in mixed media and printmaking coming up. As for my work, I’m excited to see how my process grows and changes this month.

Q: Where else can we find you?
Check out Binder Projects and my website.

Meet the Artist in Residence: Emily Tyman

Emily Tyman, artist in residence at Main Street Arts, during the months of October and November2018, is working in one of our two studio spaces on our second floor. We asked Emily some questions about her work and studio practice:

Emily Tyman

Emily Tyman

Q: Tell us about your background. 

I grew up in Geneva, NY and went to college at the University of Rochester.  Originally I was a Biology major but quickly switched to Studio Art. I had always liked to make art, but in college, I experimented with different mediums and had amazing professors as mentors. I’ve tried many different types of art such as photography, sculpture, and performance art, but I always came back to painting as my favorite medium.

"Reflect", acrylic on linen, 18"x18", 2018

“Reflect”, acrylic on linen, 18″x18″, 2018

Q: How would you describe your work?

My recent work has been focusing on color and shapes and breaking down environments. I want to highlight the materials that I use, such as the linen or wood that I paint on and make that material as equally important as the paint that I’m using.

Q: What is your process for creating a work of art?

I used to always sketch out a plan and my paintings would usually end up being very close to the original sketch. Recently, I’ve tried to not be so strict with my paintings and just start something and not know how it’ll end up. While this was scary for me, it was a very liberating way to paint that I’ll continue to do with my pieces.

"Continue", acrylic on linen, 18"x18", 2018

“Continue”, acrylic on linen, 18″x18″, 2018

Q: What is the most useful tool in your studio?

Brush conditioner. Cleaning up is my least favorite thing to do and I’m not always the best at taking care of my brushes. The conditioner helps so much when I don’t thoroughly clean the paint off my brushes.

Q: What kind of music do you listen to? How does music affect your artwork?

I usually listen to a lot of pop music but when I’m in the studio I will listen to art rock and indie rock. Anything with a good beat that will keep me focused on the piece I’m working on. A lot of times I work without any music, just listening to ambient noises. Sometimes that makes it easier for me to become distracted so then I’ll put music on.

"Setting Sun", acrylic on wood, 2'x2', 2018

“Setting Sun”, acrylic on wood, 2′x2′, 2018

Q: Do you collect anything?

I hoard a lot of random items and basically keep everything. It’ll be anything from wood bark to flower stem tubes. I have over fifty topography maps. I want to hang onto things that I think I could use in the future for different art pieces. Most of the time I end up not using anything that I’ve kept but I like to have it just in case. One day I might need it.

Q: What are your goals for this residency?

My goal is to become more comfortable with abstract work. I started to try and incorporate abstract elements into my recent pieces, but I want to see how I can develop those ideas further.

"Seneca", acrylic on linen, 11"x12", 2018

“Seneca”, acrylic on linen, 11″x12″, 2018

Q: What’s next for you?

Eventually, I want to go back to school for an MFA in painting. Applying to school again is very intimidating and so I want to get to a place where I am a lot more comfortable with my portfolio.

Q: Where else can we find you?

My website and my Instagram.

Meet the Artist in Residence: Jill Grimes

Jill Grimes, artist in residence at Main Street Arts during the month of August 2018, is working in one of our two studio spaces on our second floor. We asked Jill some questions about her work and studio practice:

Artist Jill Grimes

Artist Jill Grimes

Q: Please tell us about your background.
I moved to the Boston area in 1999 to attend the Post Baccalaureate  Program in Studio Art at Brandeis University, then to Boston University for an MFA in Painting. I also went to the Kansas City Art Institute for a BFA in Painting.

I’m a Full Time Lecturer in the School of Visual Arts at Boston University, where I’ve taught for the past 12 years. I’m lucky to work with a fantastic group of faculty and students.

Boston Studio 2018

Boston Studio 2018

Q: How would you describe your work?
I primarily make oil paintings in the still life tradition—working from observation in the studio from a set up that I arrange specifically for each painting. I am working with flowers, plants and trees at the moment. I’ve also been making cut paper pieces recently, and drawing more as a part of my practice.

"Arrangement II" (left) and " "Untitled" by Jill Grimes

“Arrangement II” (left) and ” “Untitled” by Jill Grimes

Q: What are your goals for this residency?
I brought a wall-sized piece that I want to develop and think about. I also will work on implementing  some ideas about using different languages in my work: flat shapes, line, fully articulated form (in the same space). It’s something I’ve been thinking about this year.

MSA Studio Day 1

MSA Studio Day 1

Q: Who is your favorite artist and why?
I don’t have one favorite artist at any one time, but look at different things that may inform what I’m working toward. Right now I’m looking at this:

Fresco from the House of Livia, Museo Nazionale, Rome

Fresco from the House of Livia, Museo Nazionale, Rome

I’m also looking at Bonnard, Klimt landscape paintings, and 17th century Dutch still life.

Q: Do you collect anything?
I collect tiny pinecones. I also collect postcards of paintings I like so I can curate a dream painting show with them.

Members of the pinecone collection

Members of the pinecone collection

Where else can we find you?
My website is jill-grimes.com  and you can find me on Instagram @grimes5000

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Jim DeLucia

I have always been creative as far back as I can remember. It wasn’t until I went to college that I began to paint. I mean really paint. I earned my BFA in 2002 and didn’t officially become a full-time artist until 2013.  Soon after, I shifted into the role of stay-at-home dad and nighttime painter. And here we are.

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My current studio set up, my basement.

These are my favorite brush sizes and palette knife shape.

These are my favorite brush sizes and palette knife shape.

My painting Salt Life is a loose representation based off a photo from a mini vacation to Florida. I was visiting a friend who moved there from Rochester. He would always say “It’s the salt life, Jim.” I don’t really venture out into water, but there is something about the ocean that just gets me. Always changing. That’s attractive to me.

Salt Life, Oil on paper.

Salt Life, Oil on paper.

All my work is oil paint and graphite on canvas or paper. My style and subject matter has seemed to change over the years but the materials have remained. Landscapes , dogs, patterns and pink are the usual suspects in my work. I’m kind of all over the place.

Stella, Oil and colored pencil on canvas. Current pet portrait work in progress.

Stella, Oil and colored pencil on canvas. Current pet portrait work in progress.

I am currently painting pet portraits, figuring out Adobe Illustrator, and trying to finish a children’s book influenced by my daughter’s pink boots.

Pink Boots #14, graphite and colored pencil on paper. A page from children's book project.

Pink Boots #14, graphite and colored pencil on paper. A page from children’s book project.

You can see more of my work at  www.jimdelucia.com or @jimdelucia on Instagram.


Jim DeLucia is one of 28 artists featured in “Land & Sea”, a national juried exhibition of landscapes and seascapes juried by Deirdre Aureden, director of programs and special projects at the Schweinfurth Art Center in Auburn, NY. The exhibition runs through June 29, 2018.

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Ruth LaGue

I grew up in Alaska, awed by the incredible vastness of the wild landscape. Gazing at the expansive skies and majestic mountains as a girl, I recognized that I was a small part of something much larger than myself.

"Migration" by Ruth LaGue, Best In Show winner in Land and Sea at Main Street Arts.

“Migration” by Ruth LaGue, Best In Show winner in Land and Sea at Main Street Arts.

Traveling through India in my twenties, I became consumed by the landscape of the spirit — that limitless interior universe that lives in each of us. The marriage of the two experiences ignited a lifelong quest to connect the outer and inner within my paintings.

To me, landscapes represent fragments of time that will never be again; intimate moments of communion with something greater than myself; quiet meditations to which I bear witness.

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Work by Ruth LaGue

The most exciting part of the creative process is observing the juxtaposition of colors and textures as they form a depth of field — how a simple dark line next to a light field of color can come alive.

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Ruth in her studio

I use palette knives, mixing colors on the surface of the canvas and using visual economy in my work, reducing the landscape to its barest form.

I rarely come to the studio with an idea of what I’m going to paint but rather listen for the inspiration from within.

I always wanted to go to art school. I applied and was accepted to the Rhode Island School of Design to study graphic design; after graduation I began a career as a graphic designer and later as a web designer. Ten years ago, I found a studio space at the Gorse Mill Studios in Needham, MA and began painting. I’m grateful I’ve had the opportunity to explore two very different aspects of my professional life.

I can be found online at www.laguewax.com, on Instagram: @ruthlague and on Facebook: @Laguewax


Ruth LaGue is one of 28 artists featured in “Land & Sea”, a national juried exhibition of landscapes and seascapes juried by Deirdre Aureden, director of programs and special projects at the Schweinfurth Art Center in Auburn, NY. Ruth’s painting “Migration” won Best In Show. The exhibition runs through June 29, 2018.

Meet the Artist in Residence: Dain Q. Gore

Dain Gore, artist in residence during the month of June 2018 at Main Street Arts, is working in one of our two studio spaces on our second floor. We asked Dain some questions about his work and studio practice:

Artist Dain Q. Gore

Artist Dain Q. Gore

Q: Tell us about your background.
I was born in Phoenix and live in Laveen, AZ. I have been there my whole life. I keep thinking what it would be like to move but in my travels I have yet to find a Goldilocks Zone for that (except maybe Japan). I have an MFA in painting (2009) and BFA in drawing (2000) from ASU. When I’m not making art for upcoming shows I like to perform puppetry at the Great Arizona Puppet Theater in the Puppet Slams.

Q: How long have you been making artwork?
I was just telling a friend that the only good days I really remember about grade school were when I could draw, especially when it was “rainy day schedule.” As a small kid, there really was nothing much else of significance for me than drawing and collecting action figures and video games. Socialization came much later in life.

"Histrionics of Medicine" by Dain Q. Gore

“Histrionics of Medicine” by Dain Q. Gore

Q: What was your experience like at art school?
I’ve also been talking about this a lot lately. My perspective now has been oddened, as peers are relating experiences that I simply did not have. For some reason I feel like I had some kind of plot armor, or that as I recall it, knew I could accept or reject anything tasked of me. This was best illustrated when a professor gave me a long list of corrections to my painting, followed by, “Or not…just keep painting!” This became a running joke at critiques but stuck from then on. This probably made the most sense of anything I ever learned in art school. Any kind of actual learning—not mimicking, not repeating–I think involves a moment where you simply have to do and stop thinking.

Tardinaut-edit

“Tardinaut” by Dain Q. Gore

Q: Do you have a job other than making art?
I do! I am currently a faculty adjunct at South Mountain Community and Phoenix College. In addition, I have been substituting at Metro Arts, an arts-based high school in Phoenix. I’ve also been starting to do workshops based on some of my specific niche areas of interest in art, such at the Exquisite Corpse  and painting board gaming miniatures. I also perform puppetry, as mentioned above, which often intervenes into my exhibitions.

"Exquisite Corpse" by Dain Q. Gore

“Exquisite Corpse” pieces by Dain Q. Gore

Q: How would you describe your work?
My work is colorful, experimental, playful, image-ridden and fragile.

Q: What is your process for creating a work of art?
My process very often involves turning on some music (I like art/prog rock) or Coast to Coast AM or an audiobook (currently trying to finish Snow Crash) to get started. I get out a piece of foam core and draw out a basic shape using a white China marker, paint directly onto the surface (sometimes with gesso or medium first).

Q: What are your goals for this residency?
My goals were initially to experiment further, but now I have a list of several things I would like to play with that may still involve my process.

ArtClocky

“Art Clocky” by Dain Q. Gore

Q: Who is your favorite artist and why?
I have so many too pick just one: James Ensor, Philip Guston, Martin Wong, Wayne White. There are so many great ones on Instagram now, too. I would have to say James Ensor overall, though, because his life echoes his art so closely in such a surreal way and feels like an echo of my life and art, too.

Q: What type of music do you listen to?
As mentioned, music can be crucial to getting me out of my own head and on to painting surfaces. I love DEVO, Blue Oyster Cult, Oingo Boingo, Idiot Flesh (and its numerous incarnations), Father John Misty, Of Montreal, Talking Heads, Neon Indian, Stereolab, Adam and the Ants, Al Stewart…

"Avatar of Kek" by Dain Q. Gore

“Avatar of Kek” by Dain Q. Gore

Q: Do you collect anything?
I “used to” collect action figures. I have a hopeless fascination with them, and it certainly has influenced my aesthetic choices and being a puppeteer. I also collect (and sometimes actually paint) the aforementioned miniatures.

Q: What’s next for you?
As soon as I get back to AZ I have to start working on a Puppet Slam piece for GenCon, two shows I will be featured in at Eric Fischl Gallery in September and Fine Arts Complex in October, in addition to the monthly AZ Puppet Slams!

Q: Where else can we find you?
I can be found on Instagram @daintist and at www.daingore.com


Dain will be teaching two workshops during his residency at Main Street Arts. The first will take place on Saturday, June 16 from 12 to 3 pm and will focus on the Surrealist game of Exquisite Corpse—a spontaneous, group-collaborated creature where the only limit is your own imagination (see image above). Perfect for a group of friends! Sign up here.

The second workshop, taking place on Saturday, June 23 from 12 to 3 pm, will give participants to create puppet-like paintings that Dain calls “INGs”. Somewhere between two-dimensional paintings and sculptures, these objects represent an element of play as well as a thoughtful approach to the layered sensibility of painting (see images above). Sign up here.